SULTANATE OF OMAN, MINISTRY OF TOURISM

SULTANATE OF OMAN, MINISTRY OF TOURISM

SULTANATE OF OMAN, MINISTRY OF TOURISM

Thursday, 25 September 2014

Bringing the Arabian Sea to life

Oman’s waters are brought to life by coral, crabs and colourful fish bringing the Arabian Sea to life. Whether it’s deep-sea diving or paddling pool depths, there is an underwater world waiting to be explored that can be appreciated from both above and below the water.


In sharp contrast to the arid environment that lies above, there is a multicoloured scene laid out below. The intricate structures of the coral reefs are expertly manoeuvred by Arabian angelfish, lion fish and silver fusilier fish, to name just a few of the 900 species that swim amongst the waters. 


Musandam on its own has more than 25 dive sites and in particular may attract some experienced divers who are in search of some invigorating drift diving. As commercial fishing is not allowed in this area of water, the volume of marine life is boosted substantially and it’s not unusual for divers to encounter most turtle species and a number of shark species. Favourite snorkel and dive spots include the Dimaniyat Islands nature reserve (a UNESCO world heritage site), Bandar Khayran and Fahal Island.




As the saying goes ‘there’s bigger fish to fry’ and in Oman’s case around a quarter of the world’s 88 species of cetaceans have been spotted in the coastal waters off Oman. Large groups of dolphin shoals are frequent visitors to the shores of both Muscat and Musandam and in a stunning display a group of over 2000 long-beaked common dolphins have been seen churning the surface of the water as they travel. Bryde’s whales are the most common whale species as are a group of Arabian Humpback Whales - the only group in the world that doesn’t migrate and can often be spotted off the coast of Salalah. A few lucky ones have even made sightings of Sperm whales!



The waters are also home to many different species of turtles, thousands migrate annually to lay their eggs on the shores of Oman. The arduous work of digging holes in the sand to bury their eggs lays the foundations to one of the most watched and loved moments of the year, for conservationists and tourists particularly, as the eggs hatch and baby turtles begin their dangerous journey to the waters edge. The Masirah is the largest nesting ground for the Loggerhead turtles in the world and Omani culture proudly protects this area with a week dedicated to conservation-focused activities. 



The rich waters of Oman are an oasis of calm overlaying an unimaginable underwater world. [ CLICK TO TWEET ] The outstanding preservation and cultivation of the marine life creates every diver’s dream. But there is only one way to truly find out for yourself, take to the waters and see!